Free Consultation

Lowell & Lahann

Tulsa Employment, Injury and Disability Attorneys

 

Free Consultation

Lowell & Lahann

Tulsa Employment, Injury and Disability Attorneys

Workplace injury causes death of road construction worker

| Sep 29, 2015 | Workplace Accidents

Road construction workers nationwide, including in Oklahoma, are exposed to a host of safety hazards. Construction company owners are responsible for providing safe workplace environments for their employees, but unfortunately, known hazards are often left unaddressed. A teenage worker at a road construction site in another state recently lost his life after suffering a fatal workplace injury.

This workplace accident is still under investigation, and not many details were made available. The medical examiner’s report indicated that the 18-year-old worker’s death was caused by several blunt force injuries he suffered in a pedestrian-forklift accident. The worker was on ground level and not operating the forklift.

The injured worker was transported to a hospital but succumbed to his injuries within an hour, and one other worker apparently also suffered injuries of unknown severity. The accident reportedly occurred on a recent Monday morning on the Bong Bridge, linking Minnesota and Wisconsin via U.S. Highway 2. Local authorities are investigating the incident, and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration also investigates fatal workplace accidents.

If an Oklahoma family loses a loved one due to a fatal workplace injury, the immediate financial implication may be overwhelming. Nevertheless, financial relief is available in these circumstances. A victim’s covered dependents are typically entitled to death benefits provided by the workers’ compensation insurance fund. In addition to a financial package to address the loss of the victim’s income, compensation for end-of-life expenses and medical costs incurred in the time leading up to the worker’s death are also provided.

Source: wdio.com, “Worker Killed at Bridge Construction Site was 18“, Sept. 21, 2015